Launched!

After two winters spent in the snow and cold of Ottawa, we are back in Green Cove Springs, Florida getting ready to launch Strathspey. We left Strathspey at Holland Marine which is attached to Reynolds Park Yacht Center – both of which are good hurricane hidey holes as they are far inland down the St Johns River. These marinas use the old piers that were built to service navy warships and train service men; at one time there were almost 20,000 sailors and navy pilots stationed here. After the second world war there were over 600 ships docked at huge piers. Most of this has long since fallen into disrepair. Holland Marine has a few docks for boats and good haul out facilities though.

We waffle over whether Strathspey has fared well in this hot and sunny climate without daily TLC. When we consider that our boat has come through two major hurricanes unscathed (Mathew in 2016 and Irma in 2017), we feel pretty positive. But when we take stock of all the boat bits that need replacing this year due to salt corrosion and sun damage, we’re a little taken aback.

Our 17-year old windlass motor

Our 17-year old windlass motor

Back in Ottawa while planning our pre-launch boat projects, we had a few big items on our ‘fix or replace’ list and number 1 on that list was our 17 year-old anchor windlass. We’d had a lot of trouble with the windlass while in Cuba on our last cruise and Blair has taken it apart more than once to address corroded wires.

The windlass that we use to deploy 150 feet of chain is basically a two-part workhorse – a deck-mounted gypsy that guides the chain out of the water and into our anchor locker and a big motor that hangs unobtrusively below the deck and powers the windlass. After spending all this time in salt water, the motor was so corroded it was beyond fixing. As well, the chain stripper which forces the chain off the gypsy and down into the anchor locker had broken in half.

Shiny windlass

Our brand new windlass motor

Blair spends almost two days installing and wiring our new Lewmar windlass and it is now a thing of beauty on Strathspey’s bow. Alas, the foot pedals that power the windlass to bring the chain up and down have such corroded wires that we order new ones; another expensive item, another half day to install.

After Strathspey is splashed and we move aboard, we discover that all the important bits on our toilet are seized. At this point a functioning toilet is numero uno on our list of must-get-working bits. Strathspey’s toilet is 17 years old and, although Blair could rebuild it for probably the seventh time, he opts for a brand new toilet after scoping out all the other jobs on his ‘must do’ list. The toilet will be delivered on Thursday and I make plans to be away from Strathspey running errands while that particular installation takes place, as I know it will involve leaking hoses, heavy lifting and lots of cursing.

We have 25 gallons of diesel in our fuel tank and we’re concerned that, after sitting in this hot climate for two years, it will gum up our engine so Blair calls a mobile fuel polishing/filtration company to check our system. Best-case scenario is that we just need the fuel polished, a process which removes algae, any condensed water and other impurities. Worst-case scenario is that the fuel is bad and we need to have our diesel emptied and hauled away for expensive but environmentally safe disposal. The mobile unit arrives and after negotiating the money angle, a team of two rolls their mobile unit down the dock to Strathspey. Fuel, the polishing of, the filtration of and just about anything else you want to do to fuel is a finely honed business and it appears we have a team that knows their stuff. After the all-important ‘sniff’ test, they both agree that the fuel is just fine and probably only needs some polishing. That sniff test is for a whiff of sulphur, which would indicate that there is too much algae to try to salvage the fuel but we pass that test so all looks good. They move on to siphoning our 25 gallons of diesel through three filters and a water separator and remove some black ‘yick’ from the bottom of our tank and pronounce us good to go.

On the interior side of things, we purchased a Sirius satellite radio for Strathspey this fall and Blair installed it and we now have access to over a hundred stations. He programmed button #1 for the Beatles channel and #8 for CBC news but we’re also enjoying the NPR station as well. Friday and Saturday the temperatures plummet as a strong cold front moves through. At night the temps are down to near freezing but we are toasty inside with our Espar furnace running continuously, listening to good radio and working on all the ‘inside’ jobs (replaced the carbon monoxide alarm and the solar vent in one of our hatches and spliced shackles onto a few halyards). Sunday morning when we get up we see that there is frost on our car windshield! This is temporary though and the forecast is for mid-20’s Celsius by Tuesday. This is a good reason to never book a one-week trip to Florida to get away from the northern cold and snow; nice weather is iffy here at this time of year – it could be warm or it could be cold…luck of the draw.

I spend quite a bit of time schlepping boxes of boat stuff from our storage locker to Strathspey and, after two years away from it all, it’s been fun to open a box to discover what’s inside, much like an early Christmas. We’ve also been culling items from the boat – Blair discovers he has more than 20 T-shirts to stow away and there’s no way they will get stored aboard. I’m no better because upon our arrival here in Florida I bought tank tops and T-shirts, not remembering that I had left an entire summer wardrobe packed away in our storage locker.

I don’t do any major provisioning for Strathspey just yet but I do go grocery shopping for a very small amount of food so we can stop eating out at restaurants. We are reacquainted with US-South-of-the-border portion sizes very quickly and most often we share an entrée but this doesn’t always work given Blair’s predilection for things like meat loaf and liver with onions!

One day we go to the West Marine in Jacksonville to buy assorted boat bits but I have my eye on the Costco there so I drop Blair off and head out to try to find my way over to the Costco. Both the West Marine and the Costco are in the same mall but this is the biggest mall of my life! I actually have to enter the Costco address into our car’s GPS in order to find it.

Mast was only apart because of brand new rigging which is very, very shiny :)

Mast was only apart because of brand new rigging which is very, very shiny 🙂

Today, Blair finishes assembling the furling system on the mast (that’s the unit that whirls our foresail into a tight little roll after every sail). As well, he attaches all the new standing rigging that Holland Marine made for us. It was an all day job but it’s finally done and now we wait for one stupid little $20 part to install before we can lift the mast onto Strathspey and be an actual sailboat.

I get ambitious and make a trip to Lowe’s hardware and buy a screen replacement kit and start changing out all the screens on Strathspey that have started looking sad. It’s a neat little kit and I’ve amazed both of us with these well-stretched screens in both our companionway boards and two overhead hatches. I am my mother’s daughter!

So, it’s going slower than usual but we’re not complaining because there is no snow down here and any day on the water is a good day, yes?

4 thoughts on “Launched!

  1. Truly this is a labour of love, getting the boat seaworthy again. The process demonstrates just how crucial it is that the sailors have high-level “bit-fixing skills”.
    Sounds like your departure is imminent.
    Fair Winds and Following Seas??

    • Hi guys! I’m sure it has warmed up for you in PCB just like over here on the ICW. And, yes, I’m pretty happy that Blair is a bit-fixer extraordinaire. Have a great Christmas!

  2. Hey Mary and Blair: I was wondering how things were going- thanks for the update! I remember well the work involved in getting the boat shipshape after a long sit on the hard. For us it wan’t worth it due to lack of ability to use the boat for a long duration after much effort to commission it, ergo we sold. You will almost have a new one before launch. Do you expect to be in the water by Xmas? Do you have any firm plans yet? Anyway, thinking of you two-it is really cold here for this time of year and the river flash froze over Dec 14th. we have lots of snow with more to come. You are not missing a thing! Have a Merry Christmas where ever you will be and a safe crossing. Take care, Wendy and Glenn

    • Hi Wendy and Glenn,
      We have heard from Brooklyn that it is snowing and blowing in Ottawa so, yes, we aren’t missing anything too much right now. We will spend Christmas Day with good friends in Vero Beach and then head further south on December 29th. Have a wonderful Christmas!

Comments are closed.